Time has gone so quickly this week. One moment it’s a Sunday, friends are round, food is being served. Then, a week of work; a blur of tasks, deadlines, calls and decks. Never in my life have I ever made so many slideshow presentations back to back. But it’s all good; there’s this accelerated learning that happens right at the edge of the comfort zone—a sweet spot where every single day you pick up a new facet of knowledge that you can use to inform and refine how you work going forward. This week what really stood out, and what I’ve really started to get to grips with, is the idea of content distribution.

This is something I have historically been rubbish at. I would go and do adventures, expeditions or noteworthy things and then not talk about them at all, aside from doing my motivational type public talks for a number of businesses. I thought, if I did anything more than one tweet, then I was being over the top. What I’ve learned recently is a how to get my content more widely seen.

And so, bit by bit, I’ve experimented with the followings methods of boosting the reach of my content.

Google Ads

My first foray into AdWords Express has been interesting. I’ve had a campaign running for the past two weeks on the minimum daily budget (£1.64). In that time, it’s had 11,789 views and 139 clicks and 1 phone call click. However, perhaps the best value is the keyword generation that comes with paying for ads. Based on your industry and geographic location, AdWords Expresses shows you exactly what keywords it’s targeting and which ones are driving back clicks. You can then take theses essential keywords and weave them into your website copy to further enhance your organic SEO ranking.

Google Trends

If you want to get really technical and geeky on keywords, Google Trends shows what search terms are trending and at what times—although the field of exploration is a little bit too niche to throw up many hits or useful information.

Hootsuite

Likely familiar to all self-promoting adventurers, Hootsuite is an essential (and free) tool for scheduling your social media posts. A regular posting cadence is important if you are to keep yourself top of mind with your target audience (again, something I have been terrible at until recently). With Hootsuite, you can lay out the framework for an entire month in less than an hour: all I did was make an excel sheet drop in picture thumbnails from each adventure and write a caption for every photo and presto—a fully automated social media page. 

Buzzsumo

Buzzsumo measures what individuals on social media are sharing. Like Google Trends, it is perhaps of more use to operational businesses rather than adventure-minded individuals, but it is interesting to see which exploration-themed topics are being shared and from what sources (mainly National Geographic). 

OptinMonster

Newsletters are one of the most effective ways of converting casual readers into die hard followers and OptinMonster is one of the most efficient ways of enticing people to sign up. With visually appealing lightboxes that pop up after a certain amount of action has been taken, for example reading 50% of this article, this form can yield up to 70% more leads than a normal email sign up box. No technical website skill is involved either, featuring just a  HTML embed code or simple WordPress plugin

Outbrain

Last but not least, OutBrain gets your content appearing on other peoples’ websites. You’ll have seen versions of this before in the guise of those annoying clickbait titles at the bottom of news articles, but the industry is growing up rapidly and the stigma these backlinks once garnished are fast diminishing.

Be warned, this is a pricy option with a minimum spend of £10 a day, but it might be worth trying for a short time frame as you’ll see what sort of sites are driving traffic back to your website and hence what sort of content your audience naturally reads. If you produce more of this, they’ll start coming back organically. 

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